Can you live in a hotel?

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The short answer? Yes. Yes you can.

The long answer? You have to be organized to make sure you have everything you need.

THERE IS NO REAL DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN APARTMENT AND A HOTEL

…only that you’re paying so much more at a hotel, but at this point I’m assuming you already figured this out!

You just have to adapt to what the hotel gives you and fill in the gaps of what you need.

YOU CAN STAY IN HOTEL APARTMENTS

These places come with weekly cleaning, wifi, TV, free laundry (sometimes ensuite), a small kitchen (no oven sometimes, but at least a fridge and a microwave), and varying sizes of space.

You will be able to do everything you need to do, and if anything goes wrong, you can ask the front desk for help.

We like Candlewood Suites or the Marriott Residence Inn. There are also other brands like StayAmerica and the Hilton Suites, and they all tend to be grouped in the same area.

It costs about $40/night for a month ($1200 total), which is SO cheap compared to the $60/night for the month ($1800 total) that we paid in Canada for something similar.

In general, the U.S. has a TON more choices for apartment hotels than in Canada or anywhere else we’ve been.

HOW TO COOK IN A HOTEL ROOM

…but even if you can’t get a hotel apartment, you can live in a regular hotel.

Heck, we do this when we go on vacation — we ‘live’ in hotels for short periods of time and make sure that we have the tools we need to make the food we want to eat.

You would just need to buy a little burner, rice cooker, pan and some utensils to do some basic cooking. Something like what we did in Asia when we were in Hong Kong for 2 weeks:

The cost was about $80 – $100 CAD for the following items to outfit each hotel pantry.

  1. Induction burner
  2. Pan
  3. Condiments
  4. Spatula
  5. Cloth
  6. Chopping Knife
  7. Rice cooker (doubles as a pasta cooker/pot to boil water in to cook food)
  8. Bowls
  9. Chopping Board

The kettle always comes in the Ibis hotel as a bonus, so we never had to worry about buying a kettle.

When we were done with the items, we just gave them away by leaving them in huge bags by the trash bins/roadside.

Or eat out all the time (an option I don’t really like), which is what a lot of hotel-dwellers do, but it gets expensive in my opinion.

READ:Minimalist, College and Mobile cooking

SERIOUSLY, WHAT CAN YOU MAKE IN A HOTEL ROOM WITH THAT?

Lots of stuff. Check out some meals we’ve cooked in a hotel room with just what we had above (sometimes less!)

 

You know what?

For these meals below, we didn’t even need a kitchen. We just bought plates, a knife, a cutting board and went to town.

 

HOW DOES IT WORK FOR ALL THE REGULAR STUFF LIKE GETTING MAIL?

Easy.

You can just have everything go to the hotel, and put your room number on the front, like an apartment number.

You can also put your own voicemail on the hotel telephones and some places have a direct line with an extension to your room, rather than going through the Front Desk and getting connected.

READ: Living in a Hotel Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Obviously you cannot get everything you want if you were to live in an apartment and have a full kitchen, plus all your own THINGS, but this is the tradeoff you make when you live in a hotel or apartment hotel.

You adapt until you want to find another solution.

Any other questions about how this works? Let me know!

About everydayminimalist

I'm a 20-something year old girl who lived out of a single suitcase in 2007, and now I'm living with less, but only with the best. You don't have to get rid of everything to become a minimalist! Minimalism can help simplify and organize your life, career, & physical surroundings. You can read more about me as a minimalist. Or come and visit my other blog Fabulously Broke in the City where I got out of $60,000 of debt in 18 months, earning $65,000 gross/year.